The Real Dill - Caraway Garlic Dill Pickles, 32 oz

$14.95
Size

Crunchy pickles with a fresh garlic aroma – smooth and toasty notes coast to a tangy finish! Made with lots of fresh dill and garlic, and toasted caraway seeds.

No added preservatives Gluten Free Vegan

 

“These pickles from the Real Dill? Man, oh man. They should be sold in dark alleys.”

– People Magazine
"A jar of these hand-crafted pickles will brighten up even the plainest sandwich."

– 5280 Magazine
"The Real Dill aren’t kidding around with their name—their pickles are the real deal."

— PARADE Magazine
"Simply put, these are pickles perfected."

— Tasting Panel Magazine

- FAQ -

The number of pickles that come in a jar depends on the size of the cucumber, but on average there are around 16 pickles in each 32 oz jar. Regardless of size, we pack the jars with as many pickles as we can fit! You’ll never see empty space in the jar where we could have fit more pickles.

No they are preserved using a vinegar-based brine.

We do not contract out any production. We make everything in our own facility (called the Dillery) in Denver, Colorado.

They’ll last as long as it takes you to eat them as long as all of the product inside of the jar is submersed in the brine. If one of the pickles is sticking out above the brine and it sits like that for several months it can develop mold. Otherwise they won’t go bad. We do, however recommend eating them within one year of when they were made. The date that they were made is stamped on the jar. After one year they will start to degrade in quality and become less crunchy.

Only after they have been opened. Until then they are safe to be stored in a cool, dark place

Nope, we do not use any ingredients that you would not recognize from your own pantry or garden.

Depending on the time of year they may come from Colorado, California, Florida, Georgia, Mexico, Michigan, or wherever we can find the best quality cucumbers at the time.

We use a marginal amount of sugar because it helps to create a roundness with the salt and vinegar, helping to make those flavors a little less harsh and pronounced. We only add a marginal amount of sugar to those varieties; most people do not even detect any sweetness.


“These pickles from the Real Dill? Man, oh man. They should be sold in dark alleys.”

– People Magazine
"A jar of these hand-crafted pickles will brighten up even the plainest sandwich."

– 5280 Magazine
"The Real Dill aren’t kidding around with their name—their pickles are the real deal."

— PARADE Magazine
"Simply put, these are pickles perfected."

— Tasting Panel Magazine

- FAQ -

The number of pickles that come in a jar depends on the size of the cucumber, but on average there are around 16 pickles in each 32 oz jar. Regardless of size, we pack the jars with as many pickles as we can fit! You’ll never see empty space in the jar where we could have fit more pickles.

No they are preserved using a vinegar-based brine.

We do not contract out any production. We make everything in our own facility (called the Dillery) in Denver, Colorado.

They’ll last as long as it takes you to eat them as long as all of the product inside of the jar is submersed in the brine. If one of the pickles is sticking out above the brine and it sits like that for several months it can develop mold. Otherwise they won’t go bad. We do, however recommend eating them within one year of when they were made. The date that they were made is stamped on the jar. After one year they will start to degrade in quality and become less crunchy.

Only after they have been opened. Until then they are safe to be stored in a cool, dark place

Nope, we do not use any ingredients that you would not recognize from your own pantry or garden.

Depending on the time of year they may come from Colorado, California, Florida, Georgia, Mexico, Michigan, or wherever we can find the best quality cucumbers at the time.

We use a marginal amount of sugar because it helps to create a roundness with the salt and vinegar, helping to make those flavors a little less harsh and pronounced. We only add a marginal amount of sugar to those varieties; most people do not even detect any sweetness.