Heirloom Bean Sampler, 5 lbs

$29.75

This pack features:

  • Five Different Varieties of Heirloom Beans
  • Ideal for American, Mexican, Italian, French Cuisines
  • Fresh crop insures faster, consistent cooking time

Description

This 5-lbs sampler pack includes:

  • SANTA MARIA PINQUITO: A very small, chili-type bean that is loaded with California history. Most of us thought the Santa Maria “Pinks” were brought in with the migrant citrus workers of the 1950s (who also introduced us to the tri-tip) but now there’s some thought that it was a crop during the Mission era. Whatever its origins, it’s delicious and meaty and the perfect match for any barbecue, chili or even salad.
  • MIDNIGHT BLACK: Midnight is a true black turtle bean with a rich, traditional black bean flavor and texture. Use in any recipe calling for black or turtle beans or just enjoy on their own. These are incredibly fresh so little, if any, soaking is required.
  • ALUBIA BLANCA: Classic Alubia beans are one of our more requested items. You can use these small white European-style beans in all kinds of cooking, from Yankee baked beans to soups to Italian “beans on toast.” They have a thin skin but still manage to hold their shape, making them ideal for salads.
  • CLASSIC CRANBERRY: Cranberry beans only look like cranberries. And even then, I don’t quite see it. Originally from South America, these beans have been bred around the world and have become Madeira, Borlotti, Tongues of Fire, Wren’s Egg and many more. This is the classic from Colombia and are perfect for any recipe calling for a “cranberry” bean.
  • YELLOW EYE: Unlike Navy beans, which have a slightly gummy, babyfood texture, Yellow Eyes are dense, creamy and delicious. Great Northerns can be plain boring. Replace Navys or Great Northerns with Yellow Eyes and your dish becomes a feast.

Additional information

Weight 80 oz
Dimensions 6 x 5.25 x 5 in

I was shopping one August for tomatoes and, despite Napa being one of the world’s most magnificent agricultural regions, all the tomatoes were from a hothouse in Holland! Worse, they were hard and pale pink instead of the ripe tomatoes I was craving. I started to grow my own tomatoes and this eventually led to beans.